Quantum Mechanic

Content from 2015-11

Emacs for Writers and Notmuch

posted on 2015-11-29 17:03:00

Bored on a Sunday morning and ended up watching Emacs For Writers – a presentation by Jay Dixit, who I'm going to have to look into more, since he seemed like a cool person. It was about how he learned to use org mode to do the work that several word processing programs didn't quite do. He had a lot of fun customizations in his emacs and I might have to watch it again when I'm bored to work out somee other neat things to change. I think it might also finally be time to put my ~/.emacs.d into git so I can get at it on multiple computers and share the things I find at work/home with myself.

One of the things that flashed by in the video was notmuch, the emacs mail browser. Email is more of a pain in the butt than anything useful, these days, as family and friends use phones to contact me and work primarily uses a chat system, but what the hell, I thought, let's try doing email in emacs again (I'd previously tried gnus).

I primarily used the guide here, with some tweaks from here. Ended up modifying the latter a bit to gel with the GObject Introspection that might have come into existence after the wiki-page/python module were written. Works fine with it, though.

import gi
gi.require_version('GnomeKeyring', '1.0')
import keyring

def get_password(account):
return keyring.get_password('offlineimap', account)


It turns out that setting up offlineimap is the bulk of the work and doesn't run automatically, so I basically would need to automate running it or check my mail manually in a two-step offlineimap -> notmuch workflow? I probably won't actually continue using it, but we'll see!

Making a knitting tool

posted on 2015-11-28 19:01:47

Hey there, friends!  Over the years, I've been aspiring to making interseting web apps in Common Lisp.  At the same time, Sarah's been kniting more and more and I've gotten to see some of that world.  Lots of people use Ravelry for posting their work and it's got a strong community.  I thought it might be interesting to try to make something that formatted knitting patterns in an easy to follow way.  Maybe eventually work up to some sort of markdown extension.  We'll see where it goes.

A few weeks ago, I stuck an early version up at knttl.co!  I'm sure there are all sorts of little bugs in it.  But it's fairly pretty and quick and runs on top of PostgreSQL and Common Lisp!  It's running Eitaro Fukamachi's woo web server, which is nice and snappy.  It's ona very low tier DigitalOcean VM and I haven't configured everything that well for the environment, so it crashes if it gets too much traffic.  While it's working, though, it's pretty darn quick.  I wish I had more time/effort available to work on it, but it's hard to find the motivation after full time programming work during the week.  If you find knttl interesting or useful, though, please let me know!